II.2.2. Compile, Upload, and Run The Example Sketch

Connecting The Pedal Before compiling and uploading the compiled sketch, the pedal should be connected to the PC/laptop: Connect the PC/laptop to the pedal using USB-to-TTL cable or converter. On the Arduino IDE, go to menu Tools > Port and select the correct port (which is associated with the USB-to-TTL cable/converter. Compiling and Uploading To compile ad upload the compiled […]

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II.2. Getting Started

Using the development-mode pedal, developing and testing a digital effect application is very easy. Please note that this guide uses the latest Arduino IDE version (1.8.13 at the time of writing), so if you use other version then it might has different details of the application menu. II.2.1. Setting Up The Board Configuration Turn on the PC/laptop and run the […]

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II.1.3. Using ESP-IDF

Advanced development need to use ESP-IDF tools chain because it has more controls of the Arduino core and features. ESP-IDF framework with Arduino component enables the implementation of secure boot and flash encryption. It also enables the direct use of ESP-DSP library component (provided by Espressif) to take the benefit of ESP32-machine-optimization on various DSP functions. The latest Arduino component […]

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II.1. Development Tools and Library Installation

Developing Blackstomp effect application can be done using Arduino IDE (integrated development environment) or ESP-IDF tools chain. Arduino IDE is recommended for easy and fast setup and compilation, but ESP-IDF tools chain is recommended for advanced user. Arduino IDE doesn’t support secure boot implementation for ESP32, but once the developed sketch in Arduino IDE has been successfully compiled and run, […]

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I.10. Printed Circuit Board (PCB)

You can design your own PCB since we have provided the complete schematic diagram of the circuit, but you can always support the Blackstomp development by purchasing our BLACKSTOMP Multi Purpose (BSMP) PCB (as shown in the Figure 7) from Deeptronic. You can also buy the fully assembled board (Figure 8), or the ready-to-use development-mode pedal (Figure 9). They are […]

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I.9. Recommended Development-Mode Pedal Wiring

The recommended wiring for development-mode pedal is shown in the Figure 6. The schematic diagram shows the wiring of the off-board components. Here is the bill of (off-board) materials: NUM PART NAME QTY. Connection Reference Connection Description 1 DC socket for 9V DC input. 1 H7.1 DC input 2 SPST (normally open, momentary) foot switch 2 H13.2, X2.4 Main and […]

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I.8. UART (Serial TTL) and MIDI Port

The universal asynchronous receiver transmitter (UART) is primarily used to write the program into the flash memory, but it also handles other functions. The same port is also used for debug monitoring and MIDI communication. The J1 jumper connector is provided to enable alternate use of UART and MIDI interface: To use an UART/Serial interface, connect the serial pinout of […]

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I.7. I2C Port

I2C port X1 is designed primarily for 4 pin I2C OLED display, which can be connected directly to the port (see Figure 5). Beside interfacing with the display, I2C port can used to expand the controls and LED indicators as well. As the result, you can implement almost unlimited number of control knobs, switches, buttons, and indicator LEDs through I2C […]

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I.6. Encoder Port

Encoder port X2 can be connected to a rotary encoder with click button (EC11 or compatibles). Figure 4 shows the EC11 connection to this port. If we don’t use any rotary encoder then this port can be used for connecting 3 push button as described in the previous section (see section I.4, Figure 2).

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I.5. Control Ports

H1, H2, H3, H4, H5, and H6 are the ports for control inputs. We can use these ports to read potentiometers, selector switches, buttons, or control voltage. Buttons connection to the control ports has been described in the previous section (I.4). See Figure 2 (part C and D) for the quick reference. Potentiometer can be connected directly to the control […]

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I.4. Foot Switches and Buttons

Main foot switch (or main user button in non-pedal context) should be connected off-board through H13. The on-board button main user button KEY2 is provided for testing or maintenance. For additional buttons or foot switches, we can use any of control ports (H1,H2,..,H6) when available (not used for potentiometer or selector switch). We can also use encoder port (X2) to […]

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I.3. Indicator LEDs

LED1 is the main indicator, and LED2 is the auxiliary indicator. The main and auxiliary labelling is just for reference, as both LEDs have the same capability and we can program them independently. LED1 and LED2 are the on-board LEDs, and the panel- or enclosure-mounted indicator LEDs should be connected off-board through the header connector H16 and H17. For development […]

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